About the Snow Pea by Gardener Rosy Smit

snow-peasThe veggie of the Month at Camp Korey is Snow Peas! These sweet treats are easy to grow. The bright green peas are not to be confused with snap peas, although both are legumes and have edible pods. Snow Peas are have flat wide pods with small seeds that are barely visible through the pods. Sugar snap pods are plump with visible peas.

Here in the Camp Korey garden, we plant multiple varieties of pea seed early in the spring, in March, even if the soil is cool and wet. Sixty or so days later, we are sending harvested pods up to the kitchen to be added into the menu. The variety we plant is called “Oregon Sugar Pod II”, which produce around 30 lbs per 25 ft row. The OSP II variety outperforms many other snow pea varieties due to the fact that the plants produce two pods per node as compared to most varieties that produce one pod per node. All Snow Peas stop producing once daytime temperatures exceed 75 degrees F, so our harvest has been less than normal this year due to all the beautiful sunny hot weather.

Very versatile and a super easy vegetable to prepare, snow peas can be enjoyed raw, they can be eaten with dip, added to salads, sautéed and used as a side dish, or added to other dishes. They are low in calories and high in Vitamins A and C, making them a great addition to a healthy diet and are very kid-friendly.

Snow Pea Recipe from Executive Chef Tana Mielke

There is really nothing quite like snow peas fresh from the vine. It is one of the first crops ready in the garden and an indicator that summer is near. As a child, I spent many afternoons visiting my Grams (I called her Gram CarCar because she had an endless supply of fresh carrots for me) and Gramps. When I was hungry, Grams would hand me an empty bowl and send me to the garden to pick snow peas. Rarely did we get to the point of actually cooking the “edible pods”… most were consumed fresh from the vine until I was so full that I could not eat another.

This special snow pea dish is incredibly versatile. It can be eaten on its own or alongside some beautifully grilled Pacific salmon, herb roasted chicken or a poached duck egg! YUM! If you have leftovers (which I doubt you will), save them. These peas are delicious cold for a little snack later on. Enjoy!

Recipe: Sautéed Lemon-Mint Scented Snow Peas

4-6 Servings


4 Cups Snow Peas (strings removed)
2 Cloves Garlic (minced)
½ Lemon Zested
½ Lemon Juiced
1 tsp Honey
1 T Mint (chiffonade)
½ tsp Aleppo Pepper
2 tsp Kosher or Sea Salt
Olive Oil


1. Preheat sauté pan on range over medium-high heat. Coat lightly with olive oil.
2. When oil ripples slightly like the outer rings after throwing a stone in to a pond, add the peas.
3. Sauté for about 30 seconds, add garlic and salt
4. Peas will turn bright green.
5. Add Aleppo followed by lemon juice and honey.
6. Remove from heat, toss with mint and lemon zest.
7. Serve (at any temperature).

Learn more about our Farm to Table practices and how you can get your hands in the Camp Korey garden!